“There is only one definition of success — to be able to spend your life in your own way.” 

The author suggests that success can be defined only as spending one’s life in his or her own way. I find this definition totally unacceptable. The scope of the definition is too limited and simplistic. Moreover it fails to take into account whatever the person has achieved in his life.  

The major problem with the author’s definition is that it’s too limited. As any successful person will know, no success is possible without its share of setbacks and pitfalls. No achiever can say that he has spent every moment of his life in the way he wanted. For example: In 2001, Microsoft suffered a major setback in the famous anti-trust case; but nobody can negate the reputation the company has created in the world of software.

 

Furthermore, the author fails to notice that life has different facets. Though a person doesn’t get to do things he wanted on one front, his achievements on the other may still make him a success.  A person, who may be an utter failure on the social front, can be tremendously successful in his profession. So if Einstein did not have a very good family life, does that in any way interfere with his status as the best known Physicist of 20th century?

 

Another category of category that the author’s definition misses completely is the physically challenged people, who conquer their limitations, to attain the goals of their life. They surely don’t want to spend their life as disabled, but their goals drive them to ignore the fact that they’re not able to spend their life in the way they wanted. Stephen Hawking and Helen Keller are just two of many such successful people.

Moreover, there surely are people, who’ll fit the author’s definition of success. Perhaps a non-ambitious person, who easily attained whatever he wanted and never tried to aim any higher, can spend his life in his own way. Similar can be the case of a millionaire’s son, who gets everything that he wanted in inheritance and indulges in every pleasure that life can offer. But no sensible society can term any of these to be successful in their life.

To sum, I strongly disagree with the author’s notion of success. It’s the goals one achieves that make him successful, not the way he leads his life.

2 Responses to “AWA Issue #6:: Definition of Success”

  1. Sarah says:

    Ha ha this one was a little tougher on me because I think you and I measure success differently especially this statement “It’s the goals one achieves that make him successful, not the way he leads his life.” So what I did in this on is help with grammar and style. I put my info in your text below. Thanks! Sarah

    This sentence is a bit awkward (and remember spell out doesn’t!!) Though a person doesn’t get to do things he wanted on one front, his achievements on the other may still make him a success.
    Try…Though a person may not excel in one aspect of his live, his achievements on the other may still make him a success.

    Another category of category (not sure what you are saying here with category of category) that the author’s definition misses completely is (are) the physically challenged people, who conquer their limitations, (watch your commas because with the one you have here you are saying the physically challenged people to attain the goals of their life…is not clear) to attain the goals of their life. They surely don’t (spell out, aahhh) want to spend their life as disabled (this statement is a little off perhaps say “They surely do not label themselves as disabled or something like that you are being a little cold in this part of the passage you have to write almost like you understand their viewpoint), but their goals drive them to ignore the fact (again here…disabled people aren’t ignoring the fact they are just working hard to excel like any other person…your wording is a bit off) that they’re (spell out) not able to spend their life in the way they wanted. Stephen Hawking (also I think you mean Hawkings…only use a name if you know exactly how it’s spelt) and Helen Keller are just two of many such successful people.

    Moreover, there surely are people, (no comma needed here) who’ll (spell out) fit the author’s definition of success. Perhaps a non-ambitious person, who easily attained whatever he wanted and never tried to aim any higher, can spend his life in his own way. Similar can be the case of a millionaire’s son, who gets everything that he wanted in inheritance and indulges in every pleasure that life can offer. But no sensible society can term any of these to be successful in their life.

  2. Srini says:

    “There is only one definition of success — to be able to spend your life in your own way.”

    ———Moreover it fails to take into account whatever the person has achieved in his life.

    1) Shobhit…something missing in the first para…The very fact that the statement claims that sucess is to spend ones life as one wishes…very clear…which means..the person who set his goals WILL ALSO align his LIFE to his GOALS which again means that he is spending his/her life as s(h)e wishes

    So me thinks that…the statement…Moreover it fails….is kinda irrelevent and does not looks to clear.

    2) Yaar wherever and whatever I read…its always FLAW and not PROBLEM as you have used..(The major problem with the author’s definition is that it’s too limited.)

    3) I like this statement and was very clear *No achiever can say that he has spent every moment of his life in the way he wanted.*

    4)The example was little irrelevent…could have use d BILL GATES vis-a-vis the company (For example: In 2001, Microsoft suffered a major setback in the famous anti-trust case; but nobody can negate the reputation the company has created in the world of software.)

    Hope this helps!
    Srini

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